domenica 26 luglio 2015

THE TEDS Di CHRIS STEELE-PERKINS & RICHARD SMITH


Nei primi mesi del 1954, su un treno in ritardo da Southend , 
qualcuno tiro' il segnale di allarme . Il treno si fermo'.
Le lampadine furono distrutte. 
La polizia arresto' una banda , erano vestit1 in giacca e 
cravatta edoardiane. 
Nel mese di aprile due bande , anche loro vestiti in stile 
edoardiano , si scontrarono dopo un ballo con mattoni e calze 
piene di sabbia . Cinquantacinque giovani furono interrogati . 

A Ferragosto il primo "Best Dressed Ted". 
Il vincitore è stato un ventenne  fruttivendolo. 
Il mito Teddy Boy è nato. 
Originariamente pubblicato nel 1979 , THE TED viene ora 
ripubblicato da Dewi Lewis .Un classico di British fotografia 
documentaria , è un libro vivace e coinvolgente che unisce le 
immagini di Chris Steele-Perkins con un testo di Richard Smith 
, per raccontare una storia affascinante che si estende per 
circa tre decenni .

Christopher Horace Steele-Perkins (born 28 July 1947) is a British photographer and member of Magnum Photos, best known for his depiction of Africa, Afghanistan, England, and Japan.

Life and career
Steele-Perkins was born in Rangoon, Burma in 1947 to a British father and a Burmese mother; but his father left his mother and took the boy to England at the age of two. He went to Christ's Hospital and for one year studied chemistry at the University of York before leaving for a stay in Canada. Returning to Britain, he joined the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, where he served as photographer and picture editor for a student magazine. After graduating in psychology in 1970 he started to work as a freelance photographer, specializing in the theatre, while he also lectured in psychology.
By 1971, Steele-Perkins had moved to London and become a full-time photographer, with particular interest in urban issues, including poverty. He went to Bangladesh in 1973 to take photographs for relief organizations;[2] some of this work was exhibited in 1974 at the Camerawork Gallery (London). In 1973–74 he taught photography at the Stanhope Institute and the North East London Polytechnic.
In 1975, Steele-Perkins joined the Exit Photography Group with the photographers Nicholas Battye and Paul Trevor, and there continued his examination of urban problems: Exit's earlier booklet Down Wapping had led to a commission by the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation to increase the scale of their work, and in six years they produced 30,000 photographs as well as many hours of taped interviews. This led to the 1982 book Survival Programmes. Steele-Perkins' work included depiction from 1975 to 1977 of street festivals, and prints from London Street Festivals were bought by the British Council and exhibited with Homer Sykes' Once a Year and Patrick Ward's Wish You Were Here; Steele-Perkins' depiction of Notting Hill has been described as being in the vein of Tony Ray-Jones.
Steele-Perkins became an associate of the French agency Viva in 1976, and three years after this, he published his first book, The Teds, an examination of teddy boys that is now considered a classic of documentary and even fashion photography. He curated photographs for the Arts Council collection, and co-edited a collection of these, About 70 Photographs.
In 1977 Steele-Perkins had made a short detour into "conceptual" photography, working with the photographer Mark Edwards to collect images from the ends of rolls of films taken by others, exposures taken in a rush merely in order to finish the roll. Forty were exhibited in "Film Ends".
Work documenting poverty in Britain took Steele-Perkins to Belfast, which he found to be poorer than Glasgow, London, Middlesbrough, or Newcastle, as well as experiencing "a low-intensity war".He stayed in the Catholic Lower Falls area, first squatting and then staying in the flat of a man he met in Belfast. His photographs of Northern Ireland appeared in a 1981 book written by Wieland Giebel. Thirty years later, he would return to the area to find that its residents had new problems and fears; the later photographs appear within Magnum Ireland.
Steele-Perkins photographed wars and disasters in the third world, leaving Viva in 1979 to join Magnum Photos as a nominee (on encouragement by Josef Koudelka), and becoming an associate member in 1981 and a full member in 1983. He continued to work in Britain, taking photographs published as The Pleasure Principle, an examination (in colour) of life in Britain but also a reflection of himself. With Philip Marlow, he successfully pushed for the opening of a London office for Magnum; the proposal was approved in 1986.
Steele-Perkins made four trips to Afghanistan in the 1990s, sometimes staying with the Taliban, the majority of whom "were just ordinary guys" who treated him courteously. Together with James Nachtwey and others, he was also fired on, prompting him to reconsider his priorities: in addition to the danger of the front line:
. . . you never get good pictures out of it. I've yet to see a decent front-line war picture. All the strong stuff is a bit further back, where the emotions are.
A book of his black and white images, Afghanistan, was published first in French, and later in English and in Japanese. The review in the Spectator read in part:
These astonishingly beautiful photographs are more moving than can be described; they hardly ever dwell on physical brutalities, but on the bleak rubble and desert of the country, punctuated by inexplicable moments of formal beauty, even pastoral bliss . . . the grandeur of the images comes from Steele-Perkins never neglecting the human, the individual face in the great crowd of history.
Philip Henshe
The book and the travelling exhibition of photographs were also reviewed favorably in the Guardian, Observer, Library Journal, and London Evening Standard
Steele-Perkins served as the President of Magnum from 1995 to 1998. One of the annual meetings over which he presided was that of 1996, to which Russell Miller was given unprecedented access as an outsider and which Miller has described in some detail.
With his second wife the presenter and writer Miyako Yamada , whom he married in 1999,Steele-Perkins has spent much time in Japan, publishing two books of photographs: Fuji, a collection of views and glimpses of the mountain inspired by Hokusai's Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji; and Tokyo Love Hello, scenes of life in the city. Between these two books he also published a personal visual diary of the year 2001, Echoes.
Work in South Korea included a contribution to a Hayward Gallery touring exhibition of photographs of contemporary slavery, "Documenting Disposable People", in which Steele-Perkins interviewed and made black-and-white photographs of Korean "comfort women". "Their eyes were really important to me: I wanted them to look at you, and for you to look at them", he wrote. "They're not going to be around that much longer, and it was important to give this show a history." The photographs were published within Documenting Disposable People: Contemporary Global Slavery.
Steele-Perkins returned to England for a project by the Side Gallery on Durham's closed coalfields (exhibited within "Coalfield Stories"); after this work ended, he stayed on to work on a depiction (in black and white) of life in the north-east of England, published as Northern Exposures
In 2008 Steele-Perkins won an Arts Council England grant for "Carers: The Hidden Face of Britain", a project to interview those caring for their relatives at home, and to photograph the relationships. Some of this work has appeared in The Guardian, and also in his book England, My England, a compilation of four decades of his photography that combines photographs taken for publication with much more personal work: he does not see himself as having a separate personality when at home. "By turns gritty and evocative," wrote a reviewer in The Guardian, "it is a book one imagines that Orwell would have liked very much."
Steele-Perkins has two sons, Cedric, born 16 November 1990, and Cameron, born 18 June 1992. With his marriage to Miyako Yamada he has a stepson, Daisuke and a granddaughter, Momoe.

THE TEDS Di CHRIS STEELE-PERKINS & RICHARD SMITH

SWEET GENE VINCENT
JOHN LENNON,ELVIS PRESLEY E GLI ALIENI
ROBERT GORDON MEGAPOST - Di Federico Ballanti e Anna Abate + AUDIO LIVE The Malibu Club Lido New York 5 Giugno 1981 Con DANNY GATTON 
ELVIS PRESLEY AVVISTATO SU UN UFO
GIOVANNI CHIAVARO IL JERRY LEE LEWIS ITALIANO
JERRY LEE LEWIS : STARCLUB REEPERBAHM HAMBURG GERMANY 5 APRIL 1964
INTERVISTA AGLI STRAY CATS Di Fabio Nosotti
1961 : IL CONCLAVE DELL'URLO Di Rodolfo D'Intino  
http://helaberarda.blogspot.it/2013/02/1961-il-conclave-dellurlo-di-rodolfo.html
L'IRRIDUCIBILE Di Piero Vivarelli e Roberto Silvestri 
http://helaberarda.blogspot.it/2013/01/lirriducibile-di-piero-vivarelli-e.html
SWISS REBELS Di Karlheinz Weinberger
http://helaberarda.blogspot.it/2012/04/swiss-rebels-di-karlheinz-weinberger.html
ELMER BATTERS / 1
http://helaberarda.blogspot.it/2012/10/elmer-batters-1.html
CHUCK BERRY A MILANO 1997
http://helaberarda.blogspot.it/2012/09/chuck-berry-milano-1997.html
C'ERANO I JUKE BOX FUORI DAI BAR... Di Armando Buscema
http://helaberarda.blogspot.it/2012/06/cerano-i-juke-box-fuori-dai-bar-di.html
JAILHOUSE ROCK Di Jamie Malanowski
http://musicitaly70.blogspot.it/2013/12/jailhouse-rock-di-jamie-malanowski.html
A PROPOSITO DI JOHN BELUSHI Di Mitchel Glazer Timothy White e Marcia Resnick 
BB KING - DAL VIVO AL JVC FESTIVAL PIAZZA SAN CARLO TORINO ITALY 1995 Prima Parte Di Danilo Jans
30 GENNAIO 1969 : THE BEATLES ROOFTOP CONCERT LONDON...IL PIU' INCREDIBILE DEI LIVE + BONUS AUDIO EXTRA!
http://musicitaly70.blogspot.it/2015/06/30-gennaio-1969-beatles-rooftop-concert.html
8 GIORNI DOPO JOHN LENNON ERA MORTO Di Allan Tannenbaum e Roberto D'Agostino
http://musicitaly70.blogspot.it/2013/10/8-giorni-dopo-john-lennon-era-morto-di.html

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